2018.03.03 Saturday

The Food of Delusion

  1. Sensory desire (kāmacchanda): the particular type of wanting that seeks for happiness through the five senses of sight, sound, smell, taste and physical feeling.
  2. Ill-will (vyāpāda; also spelled byāpāda): all kinds of thought related to wanting to reject, feelings of hostility, resentment, hatred and bitterness.
  3. Sloth-and-torpor (thīnamiddha): heaviness of body and dullness of mind which drag one down into disabling inertia and thick depression.
  4. Restlessness-and-worry (uddhaccakukkucca): the inability to calm the mind.
  5. Doubt (vicikicchā): lack of conviction or trust.

These are the the five hindrances :[1][2][3][web 1][web 2]

2018.03.02 Friday

Problems

“Whatever problems there are in the world
Are created by the afflictions in our own minds.
A mistaken attitude is a cause for the afflictions,
Yet the pattern of our thoughts can be refined”

(Jamgön Mipham Rinpoche as quoted in The Collected Works of Dilgo Khyentse, Volume 2, Shambhala Publications, Boston  2010).

2018.03.01 Thursday

The Problem’s Not Out There, The Solution’s Not Out There

Yeas ago, one of my mentors shared the title of this post with me. Then yesterday, in the latest book I’m reading by a Tibetan Buddhist lama, I read “…everything we experience, big and small, will always lead to disappointment because we perpetually forget that everything we perceive is a product of our own minds, and … we fixate on perceptions ‘out there’ that we are convinced truly exist” (Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, Not for Happiness, Shambhala Publications, Boston & London 2012).

2018.02.28 Wednesday

Yamakavagga: Pairs
 (First Five)
translated from the Pali by
Acharya Buddharakkhita

1. Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with an impure mind a person speaks or acts suffering follows him like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox.

2. Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with a pure mind a person speaks or acts happiness follows him like his never-departing shadow.

3. “He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me.” Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred.

4. “He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me.” Those who do not harbor such thoughts still their hatred.

5. Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal.

“Yamakavagga: Pairs” (Dhp I), translated from the Pali by Acharya Buddharakkhita. Access to Insight (BCBS Edition), 30 November 2013, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/dhp.01.budd.html .

2018.02.27 Tuesday DHAMMAPADA

THE TWIN-VERSES
(First Five)

   1. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with an evil thought, pain follows him, as the wheel follows the foot of the ox that draws the carriage.

2. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with a pure thought, happiness follows him, like a shadow that never leaves him.

3. ‘He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,’–in those who harbour such thoughts hatred will never cease.

4. ‘He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,’–in those who do not harbour such thoughts hatred will cease.

5. For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love, this is an old rule.

2018.02.26 Monday

Greed, aversion, delusion destroy
the self-same person of evil mind
from whom they are born,
like the fruiting
of the bamboo. The Buddha (Itivuttaka 50)

  • Greed: gluttony, hunger, longing, craving, selfishness
  • Aversion: loathing, abhorrence, animosity, revulsion, hatred, antipathy
  • Delusion: illusion, hallucination, fallacy, mirage, mistake

Buddhist scripture uses the word delusion to mean ‘not seeing things they way they are’, especially in regards to their empty nature.

2018.02.25 Sunday

I’m starting to feel and look older. Things are falling apart. Nothing is permanent. The following strikes a chord:

151
Even royal chariots well-embellished get run down, and so does the body succumb to old age. But the Dhamma of the good doesn’t succumb to old age: the good let the civilized know.

 

From  “Jaravagga: Aging” (Dhp XI), translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (BCBS Edition), 30 November 2013, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/dhp.11.than.html .